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Abutilon pitcairnense

Yellow fatu

About the plant

Abutilon pitcairnense is extinct in the wild. It was native to Pitcairn Island in the South Central Pacific, one of the world’s smallest and youngest islands.

  • Extinct in the wild

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of the world’s species. The ongoing mission is to evaluate every plant species in the world.

    IUCN Red List Status:

    Not yet evaluated
    Data deficient
    Least concern
    Near threatened
    Vulnerable
    Endangered
    Critically endangered
    Extinct in the wild
    Extinct
  • Click on icon to reveal more

Facts

  • Extinct in the wild
  • Native to Pitcairn Island
  • Rats devour the seeds
  • Goats eat the seedlings
  • Nodding bell-shaped yellow flowers

Extinct?

Thought to be extinct, in 2003 a single plant of Abutilon pitcairnense was re-discovered by Island resident Carol Warren and its identification confirmed by two botanists from Trinity College Botanic Gardens, Dublin.


Brought back from extinction

Cuttings and seed were collected from this plant and grown in the island’s nursery. By 2004 there were seven successful germinations and several rooted cuttings in Pitcairn. A landslide killed the only wild plant in 2005, making the plant extinct in the wild. Cuttings from the Trinity College collection came to Kew Gardens in January 2010.

  • Extinct in the wild

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of the world’s species. The ongoing mission is to evaluate every plant species in the world.

    IUCN Red List Status:

    Not yet evaluated
    Data deficient
    Least concern
    Near threatened
    Vulnerable
    Endangered
    Critically endangered
    Extinct in the wild
    Extinct
  • Click on icon to reveal more