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Pinus roxburghii

Chir pine

About the plant

Pinus roxburghii is native to the Himalayas, growing from Tibet and Afghanistan through Pakistan, across northern India, Nepal and Bhutan, to Myanmar.

  • Least concern

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of the world’s species. The ongoing mission is to evaluate every plant species in the world.

    IUCN Red List Status:

    Not yet evaluated
    Data deficient
    Least concern
    Near threatened
    Vulnerable
    Endangered
    Critically endangered
    Extinct in the wild
    Extinct
  • Material
    Plant provides materials for manufacturing either fibre or timber
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Facts

  • Native to the Himalayas
  • Long drooping needles
  • Regenerates quickly after a fire
  • Used as a source of resin

Damage limitation

Fires are common in the foothills of the Himalayas. The chir pine has thick fire-resistant bark and long needles which draw fire away from the stems.

While not entirely fire proof it’s resistant to a lot of burn damage and the tree can resprout quickly. This makes it a pioneer species, which is a species that is among the first to colonise previously damaged ecosystems.


Roxburgh’s legacy

William Roxburgh was the Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Garden in Calcutta (Acharya Jagadish Chandra Bose Indian Botanic Garden), India. He commissioned many illustrations by Indian artists of plants native to India, many of these were life-size.

After his death Flora Indica (Descriptions of Indian Plants) was published, this book was based on those illustrations and also included taxonomic descriptions of a large number of plant species. Kew holds the entire collection of life-size illustrations and a copy of Flora Indica in the archives, the other copy is at Calcutta.

Named for William Roxburgh who collected in India during the 1700s
  • Least concern

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of the world’s species. The ongoing mission is to evaluate every plant species in the world.

    IUCN Red List Status:

    Not yet evaluated
    Data deficient
    Least concern
    Near threatened
    Vulnerable
    Endangered
    Critically endangered
    Extinct in the wild
    Extinct
  • Material
    Plant provides materials for manufacturing either fibre or timber
  • Click on icon to reveal more